Hear and Now: Fast-food Robots, Depressed Fish and Nile Crocodiles

Allison Loudermilk

Hear and Now: Fast-food Robots, Depressed Fish and Nile Crocodiles HowStuffWorks
Hear and Now: Fast-food Robots, Depressed Fish and Nile Crocodiles HowStuffWorks

Welcome to the seventh episode of the HowStuffWorks Now podcast. Here's the scoop on the podcast if you haven't caught it before: Each week we cover three news stories that we thought you'd want to know about, with Lauren Vogelbaum acting as your podcast host.

This week Joe McCormick kicked things off with the news that scientists have found three of the massive apex predators known as Nile crocodiles a long way from home. In Florida, to be exact. Here's the link for that study published in the journal Herpetological Conservation and Biology.

Next Jonathan Strickland gamely tackled the topic of increasing the minimum wage in the U.S. — and how that might play out in the workforce. Jonathan's coverage was inspired by the comments of former McDonald's USA president and CEO Ed Rensi, who stated that raising the minimum wage would force businesses to replace low-wage employees with robots.

Last but not least was Robert Lamb, whose story might give you pause before you chomp down on your next fish stick (that is, assuming you eat fish). Robert looked at the world of "drop-out" or "loser" fish, typically the skinny, growth-stunted ones that you'll find zoning out and floating to the surface in an aquaculture tank. According to a new study  that just published in Royal Society Open Science, those fish might be in a depression-like state, courtesy of their often overcrowded and stressful surroundings.

Have a listen, and if you like what you hear, subscribe



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