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Strange, Super and Surprising: Our Best Stories You Might Have Missed This Week


The Svalbard Seed Vault, seen here in its remote, freezing location, stores nearly a million seed samples. Hosts Josh Clark and Chuck Bryant discuss seed banks in a recent episode of Stuff You Should Know. Arterra/UIGvia Getty Images)
The Svalbard Seed Vault, seen here in its remote, freezing location, stores nearly a million seed samples. Hosts Josh Clark and Chuck Bryant discuss seed banks in a recent episode of Stuff You Should Know. Arterra/UIGvia Getty Images)

If you scrolled past some of our stories this week, no worries — we don't doubt your love for our videos, podcasts and articles. Weekdays can get busy! That's why we've rounded up our coolest stories right here, so you can catch up on what you missed. Besides, who doesn't want to learn about a 4-foot (1.2-meter) flying turkey and seed banks built to ensure the human race's survival?

The Strange

There aren't many topics of discussion stranger than cryptids. Stuff They Don't Want You to Know hosts Matt, Ben and Noel pick the brain of David Bakara, creator of a Bigfoot museum in North Georgia, in a new episode of the podcast.

Turkeys, as waddling and plump as they may be, aren't confined to the ground. But epochs ago, brush turkeys that flew and were over 4 feet (122 centimeters) tall made Australia their stomping ground, as writer Kate Kershner explains in this new article. Sounds terrifying, but probably not much more so than other intimidating, unique animals (see: cassowaries) that call the country their home.

Living on Mars might sound far-fetched and even unpleasant to some people, but SpaceX founder Elon Musk is no stranger to big ideas. A recent article details Musk's new paper on colonizing the red planet, in which the entrepreneur claims a million humans could live on Mars within the next century. Read about his bold plan here.

The Super

It goes without saying that advances in and standardization of medicine does a great deal of good for a population's health and survival — and that's not limited to humans. Stuff You Missed in History Class hosts Tracy V. Wilson and Holly Frey delve into the history of veterinary medicine in a new episode of the podcast.

Maybe imbibing is the only thing you're concerned with when it comes to gin. But for those spirit connoisseurs (and generally curious folks) interested in the liquor production process, FoodStuff has got you covered. In the latest installment of the video series, hosts Anney and Lauren visit a distillery to learn how gin is made.

Polycarbonates, a popular plastic found in eyeglasses, DVDs and water bottles, can pose environmental and health risks. But poor biodegradation, harmful chemicals and toxic production processes wouldn't be huge concerns if polycarbonates were made out of sugar, as research detailed in this recent article explores.

The Surprising

Seed banks and their monitors have been entrusted with hugely important tasks — preserving genetic diversity and keeping safe thousands of seed varieties that could potentially save us in an apocalypse. Stuff You Should Know hosts Josh and Chuck dig into the story of seed vaults and their increasing significance in a recent episode of the podcast.

Recently, a child's untimely drowning death was attributed to "dry drowning" or "secondary drowning" in media coverage because it occurred the day after his swimming incident. But some experts decry the use of these terms. Find out why the phrases are inaccurate and even harmful by reading this article.

It's long been known that the Cook pine tree, found all around the world, has a wonky way of growing. But a team of researchers made a surprising discovery about their pronounced lean — it's usually toward the equator. They don't know why yet, but you can check out some of their guesses and pictures of the tilting pines in this new article.