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Hear and Now: Stealing Avocados, Heating Up Polymers and Exercising for Memory


Hear and Now: Stealing Avocados, Heating Up Polymers and Exercising for Memory HowStuffWorks
Hear and Now: Stealing Avocados, Heating Up Polymers and Exercising for Memory HowStuffWorks

Welcome to the 10th episode of the HowStuffWorks Now podcast. 

As we've said before, think of this podcast as your weekly dose of awesome stories with a lot less scrolling and a lot more listening. Here's a slice of what the HowStuffWorks Now team was talking about this past week.

Your podcast host, Lauren Vogelbaum, reported on some unusual criminal activity happening in New Zealand. Kiwi farmers have reported multiple thefts of their avocado crop. Interestingly, this isn't the first time that the popular fruit has generated some black market activity. Lauren gives you the scoop on what's going on in New Zealand now and how California handled the same problem a few decades ago.

Robert Lamb gave us some more exercise inspiration in his segment, which explored a recent Dutch study that investigated the relationship between studying and exercise. Specifically, the researchers looked at how delaying exercise for four hours can give us a boost on declarative (or explicit) memory, the type devoted to facts and verbal knowledge. Here's the link to that study published in Current Biology.

Jonathan Strickland dove into the always cool world of materials science. He looked at a new polymer developed by researchers at the University of Rochester. What's so cool about it? If you stretch out the polymer, it stays stretched out when you let go. Apply just a little heat though, like that from your body, and the polymer "remembers" its original shape and returns to it. It could come in handy for everything from your favorite pair of jeans to wound dressings.

Any of that sound interesting? Then listen up to the embedded podcast, and if you like what you hear, subscribe



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